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In our (soon-to-be-paperless-but-not-soon-enough) office, we have boxes where messages from patients, abnormal labs, and such are placed by the staff for action by the provider. Because it is not possible for everyone to know where everyone else is at any given time, we have taken to placing paper over the cubby-holes notifying the staff that we will be out until a certain day. If one is going someplace fun, a picture or something else fun is placed on the message as well. As Chairman, my cubby is covered more that most and this past week I used my “Out Reforming Healthcare” message for 3 of the 5 days.

On Tuesday I traveled to Birmingham to meet with the folks from the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative and hear Paul Grundy speak to primary care physician leadership as well as Alabama business leadership. His message is always strong and consistent and it is getting more focused.  As a physician who is involved in direct patient care as well as population based care for IBM employees, he is encouraging all employers to stop paying for garbage (his words). From a recent interview:

“40% of the care that’s delivered, according to some folks, is unnecessary and I see it every single day.  I know parts of the country where it costs $17,000 for the last six months of life and others where it’s $127,000 and by the way the patients in the $17,000 category, this particular case in Iowa live longer and are happier with the care than the ones that are in a scenario that is over $150,000.”

He sees transformational change coming and being lead by an empowered primary care workforce. Denmark is being looked at as a model with the number of hospitals reduced by 80%, for example.

On Wednesday I traveled to Montgomery to preside over the Alabama Rural Health Association board of directors meeting. As I have detailed previously, Alabama has an impending crisis regarding the healthcare workforce in rural Alabama. Although this meeting will not make a difference as a stand-alone activity, it is refreshing to get people in a room who are able to agree on a problem, potential solutions, and set in place a strategic planning activity focused in addressing the shortage. In that meeting we committed to focusing resources on FaceBook to recruit young folks interested in rural Alabama (search on FaceBook to find the page yourself), creating a strategic plan to better direct our resources, and finalizing issue briefs on the manpower crisis in rural Alabama health care prior to January 2010. We also committed to doing rather than talking.

Lastly, we went to New Orleans on Thursday to recruit Tulane students into our Family Medicine Residency program. The refreshing thing about this trip (aside from the soft shell crab) was that we spent a lovely evening with students who clearly entered medicine for the “right reasons” and they were committed to Family Medicine. We had a very pleasant visit and hopefully will see them in Mobile during the interview process.

In summary, like Paul Grundy I believe transformational change is coming. I believe it can happen in rural Alabama. The attitude of the students on Thursday confirmed my optimism. It was, however, a long week…

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