Our neighborhood lost a local doughnut shop and I feel oddly compelled to “weigh” in. When we moved here 20 years ago, the local Krispy Kreme (built in the retail factory model of the 1960s) was a place to take the kids that served coffee and provided hours of entertainment as they (we) watched the yeasty donuts come out of the intricately timed warming component, move through the frying station (took about a minute a side) and through the glazing waterfall. As an added plus, a hot Krispy Kreme doughnut tastes like nothing else.

Why are they closing? Per their web site, they are going to a strategy of “factory stores, doughnut and coffee shops and satellite units.” I suspect they were unable to convert this to a coffee shop in a cost-effective manner, and with the construction of a new factory store in town the location is unneeded.The company has a growth strategy to bring doughnuts to multiple sites to an area through new technology that can create HOT DOUGHNUTS with minimal infrastructure and the company has an app to make consumption of HOT DOUGHNUTS even easier. From the web-site:

With Hot Light Online you can map your nearest Krispy Kreme location from your phone and get alerts when the neon glow of “Hot Now” is activated in your area. So look up, download or tweet your way to find a hot Krispy Kreme doughnut near you with any of the following free options.

Now the downside. Each of the tasty glazed morsels has 200 calories, 110 from fat (per the company’s nutritional info). Although the company reports a serving size of 1 (one) doughnut, they are most commonly purchased by the dozen meaning that the average consumer purchases between 24 and 36 hours worth of calories if you get the simple glazed. In addition to the 2400 calories you’ve consumed (after eating  “just one more” times 12), you will also get 72% of the day’s requirement of calcium and 48% of the iron.

Krispy Kreme expanded too rapidly in the early 2000s but has recently righted themselves financially and has turned a profit for 12 straight quarters. They have selected a new CEO, Kenneth May, who

…is a highly respected business leader with more than 25 years of operational, retail, supply chain and brand experience.  As part of a successful career with FedEx Corporation, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of FedEx Kinko’s Office and Print Centers, and led the integration of Kinko’s into FedEx.

I should wish them the best, but won’t. It concerns me that to increase profit, they are looking to increase sales of these little fat bullets through innovative marketing techniques. For me, these were an annual treat and now they will be less so but then again, I am not in their target demographic. To be honest I would rather hang at a locally owned shop such as Serda’s, Cream and Sugar, or even a Starbucks and spend my money on good coffee and skim milk. I encourage you to do the same.

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