1_123125_123050_2279896_2300573_2302170_3_lineup.jpg.CROP.original-originalDoes the money to pay for this come from taxpayers held at gunpoint?

Comment on a forum about an upcoming meeting on the need for Medicaid expansion

Long answer: I am serving on a panel in Fairhope, Alabama to discuss the need for Alabama to accept the Medicaid expansion. Fairhope is a Victorian resort town on the bluff overlooking the Eastern Shore of Mobile Bay, about 30 miles from where I live. The town itself was first known as Alabama City but a group pf 28 folks from Des Moines, Iowa, purchased land in the area in 1894 and created a single tax colony:

The people who established Fairhope wanted to create a community that would, as best they could, implement the theories of economist and social activist Henry George. George wanted government to tax the full rental value of land, the value of which is created by community improvements and not by labor or invested capital. He felt that if the full rental value of land were taxed (including minerals under the land) that all other taxes could be abolished, thus becoming the single tax. Others termed his theories the Single Tax, and the name stuck.

The single tax corporation collects all taxes associated with property due to state and local governments and distributes them as well as administration and demonstration fees. These fees go to things that raise the value of the property for all. These projects include bayfront parks, a pier that goes a quarter mile out into the bay, the library, and many others. The Fairhopeans do indeed get value for their housing dollar. They also get waterfront parks.

The state share of Medicaid in Alabama is not paid for by a tax on property. In fact, very little of the tax dollars the state actually collects are used to pay for healthcare for the poor, as I have previously outlined. Though the people of Fairhope may want further the common good, averages Alabamian seems much more concerned about keeping their hard-earned in their own pocket. As such, they are seemingly willing to forgo 30,000 jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars of federal money to keep their own, personal, income taxes from going to someone who is undeserving. In the words of one commenter “Why should I work anymore if the government will give me everything I need?”

So, I will go and spread the word to the gentle socialists of Fairhope of the reality that corporations look for good community health when they relocate, along with the concern that, since the mechanism to fund poor people who become sick has changed, we are getting LESS federal dollars as a consequence. I feel certain that those in the room who are true Fairhopeans will see the need for them to look after their brother and, given that the federal dollars going into Medicaid ARE OURS ANYWAY, will nod their heads in agreement. I despair of convincing the people of the rest of Alabama that poor people are folks who get sick anyway, need care to prevent illness, and Medicaid is the only mechanism to provide that care. I can only hope they remember the wisdom of the Fram oil filter man, “You can pay me now, or, you can pay me later.”

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