med27I write this blog for 3 audiences. Many of these posts are written for the lay audience. Someone will ask me while mowing the grass about ebola or chikungunya fever and I will provide my (not so) learned opinion in blog form. My friends then access my deep thoughts through Facebook so that at the next cocktail party the conversation goes like this:

Friend: I read your post about chikungunya fever

Me: Chick-a-what?

It seems I have a short memory.

Another audience I write for is folks who make policy. I have a small following of people who actually have some influence. When I write about access to care for Medicaid-gap Alabamians (my favorite subject), insurance monopolies, or the fact that a certain legislator is both against Medicaid expansion and for trying to insert a phrase into a law that takes money away from Medicaid and puts it into a client’s pocket that is the audience that I’m writing for. So, after writing a blog like that, a conversation might go:

Person in position of authority: Who is this Perkins character?

Person who actually knows me: Some commie, I suppose.

Lastly, I write for students of family medicine. In my day job, I run a department of family medicine. This means that I am involved with teaching medical students (most of whom will not go into family medicine) and resident physicians (almost all of whom will go into family medicine), seeing underserved patients (who likely do not know they are seeing a family physician), and supervising faculty physicians (ALL of whom know what they do and let me know about it ALL the time). This blog post is for this audience (but all of you others feel free to read as well).

This past week, the president of the American Academy of Family Medicine, Dr Robert Wergin, announced that Family Medicine 2.0 has arrived. Why the reset? As Don Berwick and T.R. Reid point out at the accompanying press conference, we in family medicine have been working on changing the way we do business since 2000. Meanwhile, the rest of the the medical-industrial complex, not so much. In the words of Dr Berwick, the time to change healthcare is NOW.

What we as a specialty have committed to  is this:

  • Give patients the care they need when they are most vulnerable
  • Care for patients regardless of age and health conditions, and work to sustain an enduring and trusting relationship with them
  • Be each patient’s first contact for health concerns. Address all their health concerns, and resolve most of them
  • Help patients with preventing, understanding, and managing illness
  • Navigate the health system with patients, including coordinating with specialists and staying connected with patients before, during, and after time spent in a hospital
  • Set health goals that adapt to each patient’s needs as defined by them
  • With the care team, use data and best science to prioritize and coordinate services most likely to benefit patients’ health
  • Use technology to maintain and enhance access, continuity, and relationships, and to optimize patients’ care and outcomes
So, medical students, you are on notice that you need to leave our rotation knowing that this is who we are. Residents and prospective residents, you will be held to this standard. Patients, this is our promise to you. Faculty, we have some work to do.
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