Person at a cocktail party to me: Do you think the Governor will expand Medicaid

Me to the person: If the past is prelude I think he will consider it for another two years then let the next governor decide, thus allowing many more people to be killed by lack of access to health care in Alabama then will ever be killed by terrorists in Alabama.

The Governor couldn’t decide what to do about Obamacare and poor people so he appointed a task force. His call made it pretty clear that, although Obamacare wasn’t the answer, there were indeed questions that needed to be answered. In the “Whereas” section, for example:

  • Shortages of healthcare professionals in 65 of 67 counties
  • 40th out of 50 states in primary care physicians
  • 594.000 working people between the ages of 50 and 64 wihtout health insurance
  • 10 hospitals closed in the past 3 years
  • etc, etc, etc

The task force met off and on for about 6 months and had one recommendation:

  • Find a way to close coverage gap that makes health insurance inaccessible to hundreds of thousands of Alabamians.

They didn’t specifically say “the medicaid expansion as written into the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) will solve 90% of the “Whereas”s” but they, by recommending this one thing, got awfully close.

The Alabama TEA Party response was posted on-line last week. Consistent with the national talking points, it goes something like:

We Alabamians pay enough taxes and would rather keep people with mental illness in jails, have hospitals go under, and allow people to avoid health care and die of treatable illnesses because of fear of bankruptcy rather than pay an extra $10 a year per person in taxes because we are TAXED ENOUGH ALREADY.

Fittingly, on the TEA party editorial page was an advertisement for Farxiga. which made the list of Huff Po’s worst drugs of 2014:

But the more frightening news is that patients taking Farxiga in studies done for the FDA were more than five times more likely to contract bladder cancer than the patients who took an older diabetes drug.

Priced at only $10 a day and advertised as first line treatment, I am sure it’ll end up in many physician’s sample closets. Uninsured patients with diabetes, then, who are unable to afford insulin (which is surprisingly expensive) will get lots of Farxiga samples. With any luck, they will contract bladder cancer. Because they are lucky enough to get cancer, assuming the blood in their urine scares them enough to seek care AND assuming they can find a urologist who will scope them on credit, become Medicaid eligible in Alabama. Then they can get insulin for their diabetes and get their bladder cancer treated. Don’t know why the task force didn’t recommend this, instead.

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