When asked about folks possibly dying from lack of access if we fail to maintain a Medicaid system that meets federal requirements:

“We all die sometime,” Trip Pittman (R-Montrose) said.  “We’re all mortal. We all have a finite period of time on earth. I think sometimes we confuse saving lives with extending lives.”

Wow! The state of Alabama has passed and overridden the Governor’s veto of a budget that, per the Medicaid commissioner, does not allow us to meet the federal requirements to stay in the “voluntary” program. There was a hearing on the impact of the budget on Thursday. In the lead-up to the hearings (found here) Senator Pittman was quoted as saying that the reason was that “I think there are legislators who need to more fully understand the workings of Medicaid.” A fair statement; as I have as I previously explained (here) the funding of Medicaid in Alabama is incredibly complicated. The hearing included a very informative presentation by the Medicaid Commissioner that can be found here.

Highlights of the Commissioner’s presentation are:

  • Counties with the highest unemployment have the highest Medicaid enrollment
  • Administrative costs are only 4%
  • Cost per enrollee have remained the same but the number of enrollees has increased by 30% since 2008 because of Alabama’s sluggish economy

And, the part that got Senator Pittman’s attention:

  • 1% of enrollees account for 30% of costs with 35 tragic cases accounting for almost $40,000,000 in cost to the agency

Senator Pittman’s response (heard here starting at 4:39 and accompanying article by Glynn Wilson here) would have made international news had this been one of Obama’s surrogates. Many of the federal requirements he  finds onerous provide healthcare to the “undeserving.” For example, the Feds require Medicaid to cover those who are receiving Social Security disability checks:

“[The eligibility rules]may be too liberal,” Trippman said, and “not discerning enough on whether somebody is really eligible.”

Giving to deserving people, it seems is OK. It’s  just that those who could get out and work, in the Senator’s estimation, need to get off their disabled rear ends and find jobs that provide health insurance.

He was then asked to reflect on the 35 most expensive cases:

“We’re spending more than 40 percent of the money on children in their first year of life,” Pittman, said, and added: “We’re spending a lot of money on the elderly, at the end of life. I think as a society we need to debate and look at all of these things. If not, you’re going to get into rationing.”

He then proceeds to outline possible solutions, beginning by referencing Bernie Sanders (8:30 on the video):

“[Bernie Sanders] said 80% of the costs are for elderly and for people in this state in the last few months of their lives and for people with chronic illnesses and the elderly. The reality is that we have to have some discussions about quality of life, about the expenditure of money, and about the cost. You know in this country the transfer of wealth from working to non-working, for every dollar you transfer from working to non-working you are transferring $7 from young people to old people. That’s a moral debate and that’s something people need to start talking about.”

He goes on to say that the cuts will be made, the impacts will be felt, and people will react to what ultimately happens.

There you have it. Willing to turn away $5,000,000,000 and dismantle a state’s care delivery system , so we can find out in our own little laboratory of democracy just how people will react. Again, wow!

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