Alabama is still poised to unleash the Death Angel. The night after we wrote that post I suffered a tragic loss. Danielle Juzan, my wife and silent collaborator of 33 years was stricken and died of a heart attack at the age of 55. As you can see from the attached article, she was a wonderful, passionate woman who pushed me to stand up and do the right thing regardless of the personal or professional consequences. She was also a marvelous writer and those who have read this blog over the years will never know how much she added to these posts.

She was a fixture in the local community and fought hard for improvements to Mobile, Alabama. Her attachment to our community was what made this work so important. Over the years I have looked at several jobs in places that are better positioned to provide healthcare for all citizens. Each time  Danielle would give me the reasons not to leave our house (we just got the garden where it needed to be, we are getting a dog park, etc) and ask me if we couldn’t stay in Mobile a while longer. I would agree that we had a nice life despite the seeming callousness of the public officials and we would go back to tilting at the windmill that is improving the care of the underserved in Alabama.

As I grieve, I continue to check my e-mail and am thankful for the hundreds of expressions of sympathy that I have received. For those of you who read this, thank you so much. While nothing will make it better, it is comforting to know that Danielle has touched so many.

Immediately after her death we were challenged in a message as to accuracy of the position that Medicaid (not the expansion, access to Medicaid at all) saves lives. The commenter suggested that the evidence for improved health was wanting. He pointed out that before the passage of the ACA, Oregon randomly gave several thousand people who were uninsured Medicaid coverage and followed them and several thousand uninsured for a couple of years to see what would happen. The results were as follows:

Medicaid coverage resulted in significantly more outpatient visits, hospitalizations, prescription medications, and emergency department visits. Coverage significantly lowered medical debt, and virtually eliminated the likelihood of having a catastrophic medical expenditure. Medicaid substantially reduced the prevalence of depression, but had no statistically significant effects on blood pressure, cholesterol, or cardiovascular risk. Medicaid coverage also had no statistically significant effect on employment status or earnings.

The science is pretty clear, access to health insurance over a two year period for relatively healthy people improved some aspects of their lives but is no panacea. How these findings are interpreted depends on if you live in a red state or a blue state:

Their conclusion is as follows:

In its totality, the research on Medicaid shows that the Medicaid program, while not perfect, is highly effective. A large body of studies over several decades provides consistent, strong evidence that Medicaid coverage lowers financial barriers to access for low-income uninsured people and increases their likelihood of having a usual source of care, translating into increased use of preventive, primary, and other care, and improvement in some measures of health. Furthermore, despite the poorer health and the socioeconomic disadvantages of the low-income population it serves, Medicaid has been shown to meet demanding benchmarks on important measures of access, utilization, and quality of care.

For you, Danielle. Continue to help me keep fighting the good fight.

Advertisements