[In response to increased dependence on oil from unstable countries] EEN began to create the “What Would Jesus Drive?” (WWJDrive) educational campaign in February 2002 to help Christians and others understand the relationship between our transportation choices and these three major problems – human health impacts, the threat of global warming, and our increasing oil dependence.

Evangelical Environmental Network

Remember those WWJD bracelets. Folks wore them as a reminder to act “right” when no one was looking. The letters stood for “What Would Jesus Do?” and the presumption was that in every given situation there was a “Godly” answer. Of course, placing yourself into the mindset of a person who lived 2000 years ago to establish a course of actions in a given modern-day situation led to some strange speculation. What Would Jesus Do when confronted with pork? Is veganism the established Jesus-like diet? This person can site scripture to say it is. It also leads to some creative marketing. On ETSY are several pages of handmade items embossed with the official WWJD query. One “ladies T” substitutes the letter “D” for the “J” allowing one to substitute The Donald’s thought process for those of the Other Big Guy.

In 2002 a group of creative and and liberal soles asked themselves “What would Jesus drive?” This was a time immediately after the trade towers went down. The national narrative was being shaped and it was understood that our purchasing of oil from the Middle East was a proximate source of terrorist funding, bad for the environment, and bad for our health. Their solution?  Drive smaller and more efficient cars. Not SUVs. Unfortunately, the opportunity to invade an oil rich country seemed much more the Jesus-like answer to some:

God told me to strike at al-Qaeda and I struck them, and then he instructed me to strike at Saddam, which I did, and now I am determined to solve the problem in the Middle East. If you help me I will act, and if not, the elections will come and I will have to focus on them

George W. Bush. 2005

Why the walk through memory lane? I was sent a copy of the Alabama Department of Public Health’s transportation survey (found here). Groups from every county in Alabama who care for the poor and underserved were interviewed and to a group they coalesced around a single theme -Transportation for poor people is terrible in Alabama. Agency after agency identified between 25% and 50% of their clients have to rely on friends, strangers, or don’t keep health care appointments at all because of a lack of affordable transportation. Most counties in Alabama have no public transportation; for example in Marion County:

The hospital is not aware of any other transportation entities available to patients in this area, with the exception of one called “Tommy’s Taxi Service,” consisting of one elderly man and his personal vehicle, which they have known patients to use to get back and forth from their dialysis appointments. These dialysis appointments represent one of the largest challenges to patients without reliable transportation access, due to the necessity of attending multiple times per week.

Multiple agencies including this “for profit” entity suggested that churches are the answer:

Finding a way to involve the churches and other faith-based organizations in this area with the issue of non-emergency medical transport would help a lot of people in this area, and could be done by scheduling specific pick-up points and times at regular intervals. However, issues with reimbursement and assumption of liability are most likely the largest roadblocks to developing this type of solution.

So, Jesus might drive a passenger van and make scheduled stops to keep Alabamians from having to budget tax dollars for transportation. Perhaps He would work on His followers in the legislature to create and fund an effective bus service. I’m betting He would just heal the poor, sick people in Alabama. Alabamians who drive SUVs could take their turn being sick for a while.

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