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When I was growing up my sisters and I would play the “Are we there yet” game. For those of you who do not indulge, this game is played by getting in the car, allowing the adults to begin the journey, then about 5 minutes into the ride begin asking “are we there yet?” in a rapid fire fashion using the most annoying voice one can muster. The adult’s role is to sit and ignore the game as long as possible and, when the time is right (generally about 5 minutes in) turn to the back and say “WE ARE HALFWAY, NOW SHUT UP.” At that point, the game is over and, in my family car, generally transitioned to the pinching game (“Allen is pinching me”).

Our Governor’s journey through the changing healthcare landscape has been evolving. In 2010, while campaigning for Governor, he had some deeply held beliefs regarding the newly passed Obamacare:

I started laying the groundwork for Alabama’s rejection of Obamacare by pre-filing a Constitutional Amendment to prohibit any person, employer, or health care provider from being compelled to participate in any health care system. It also codifies Alabama’s 10th Amendment rights over this issue. I have real-world solutions that will result in affordable and accessible health care for all without bankrupting our nation or pushing us closer toward a government-controlled, single-payer system.

The Supreme Court decreed the Medicaid expansion part of ObamaCare to be coercive in 2013 (As an aside, for it not to have been coercive it would have had to meet the following criteria (1) related to the general welfare, (2) stated unambiguously, (3) clearly related to the program’s purpose, and (4) not otherwise unconstitutional.) 26 states elected not to take the expansion, preferring to stick with the (poorly funded, focused on wasteful inefficient care delivery) old program. Our Governor announced that we would be one of the states refusing the Medicaid expansion:

The Affordable Care Act–or ObamaCare–and Medicaid expansion is taking our nation deeper into the abyss of debt, and threatens to dismantle what I believe is one of the most trusted relationships, that of doctors and their patients. Essential to ObamaCare is Medicaid expansion–a federal government dependency program for the uninsured. …

Now they are telling us we’ll get free money to expand Medicaid. Those are your hard-earned tax dollars. Our great nation is $17.2 trillion in debt and it increases by $2 billion every single day. That is why I cannot expand Medicaid in Alabama. We will not bring hundreds of thousands into a system that is broken and buckling.

The good news is that his view continues to evolve. Over the objection of our state senators, he is now ready to accept Medicaid expansion IF there is a work requirement, along with a few other conditions:

“It would have to be in the private sector and there would have to be some requirements on it,” Bentley told reporters in December. One specific requirement he mentioned was that he’d like to see the system tied to employment. “(Recipients) need to be working on getting a job, or having a job.”

A couple of things, Governor, to consider before you start playing the pinching game with Senator Pittman. 72 percent of uninsured adults who are eligible for Medicaid coverage live in a family with at least one full-time or part-time worker. More than half (57 percent) of these adults are working full- or part-time themselves. The overwhelming majority of workers earning less than 138 percent of poverty—81 percent—don’t have coverage through their employer because their employer either doesn’t offer it or it is unaffordable to them.The Kaiser Family Foundation recently looked at the main reasons for not working among unemployed, uninsured adults likely to gain Medicaid coverage if their state adopted the Medicaid expansion. It found that 29 percent were taking care of a family member, 20 percent were looking for work, 18 percent were in school, 17 percent were ill or disabled, and 10 percent were retired.

Maybe we really are halfway there.

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