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A United Nations official arrives in Alabama this week to investigate poverty, inequality and “barriers to political participation” in the state
Alston will spend Thursday in Lowndes County, where he will be looking at issues like health care, access to clean and safe drinking water, and sanitation.
The Guardian reported in September on a study exposing the fact that a small number of people have tested positive for hookworm – a parasitic disease found in impoverished areas around the world – in Lowndes County.
 
What he’ll find if he looks-only 30% of the citizens of the county have functional septic tanks, 1 in 3 live in poverty and 1 on 5 will have no health insurance. That’s OK because he’ll find only 2 doctors, no dentists, no psychiatrists, He’ll find that 1 out of every 100 babies die before they reach a year old (worse than most developING countries) and one in two expectant mothers have little if any prenatal care.
 
Coincidentally, he’ll find that Lowndes County has one of the lowest median property tax rates in the country, Lowndes County is ranked 2682nd of the 3143 counties for property taxes as a percentage of median income..
 
He’ll find a county where slaves outnumbered their masters by 2 to one in 1860 and the population was 26000. He’ll find a county where blacks outnumber whites now by 3 to one but the population is now only 11,000. He’ll find a county where 1 in 5 are living off social security and one in 10 have no car. 
In other words, he’ll find the Alabama people think of when you say the word Alabama.
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Today, Mobile has set its sights beyond historic racial inequality, social inequity, and environmental disasters. Residents, local government, and community-based organizations are forging a consensus on what Mobile’s future should look like, from building an economically strong downtown to providing more easily accessible options for physical activity. Increasingly, community engagement and cross-sectoral partnerships are having a visible impact.

RWJF Culture of Health Sentinel Community Snapshot Mobile Al November 2016

I have to admit when I saw this I was a little taken aback. Tied up with the implementation of a new Electronic Health Record and planning a move to a new space, I figured I must have missed an e-mail or something. Mobile was one of 30 cities chosen by the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation from around the country. They were going to watch us as we developed “a culture of health.” I thought to myself “this is great” and “wow, what a big job.” I only hope that someone has been put in charge that is up to the task.

Because, as it turns out, a “culture of health” doesn’t just mean that we have good doctors and hospitals:

Think of social determinants as the root-causes of health and disease.

Imagine a bucket full of health. This bucket has a hole in the bottom and the health is dripping out (disease). We can mop up the floor below every hour, maybe even squeeze some of the health back into the bucket from the mop. But eventually, the health will be lost because we are not addressing the root of the problem. Instead, we can look for ways to prevent the hole and stop the leak from occurring.

And per the report we have a ways to go:

  • The median household income in Mobile is $38,644 per year, compared with $43,511 for Alabama and $53,482 for the United States (Figure 1).3 Inequality between the city’s black and white residents is striking, with black residents earning about half the median income of white ones. If you are poor you cannot afford good food, educational activities, or safe housing. These all are associated with poor health outcomes.
  • While more likely to have some college education or an associate’s degree in 2014 than they were in 2010 (Figure 2), the percentage of black residents who had a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2014 declined from 2010, despite increases in higher education among white residents. Educational attainment is always associated with better health outcomes. 
  • Teen pregnancy rates in Mobile County are 57 per 1,000 for women aged 13 to 19, compared with 47 per 1,000 in Alabama and 20 per 1,000 in the United States. Teen pregnancy is associated with a lack of knowledge regarding contraception and a lack of access to effective long acting contraceptive methods.
  • The county’s mortality outcomes are higher than the national average for preventable noncommunicable diseases, such as heart diseases, cancer, and diabetes. This reflects limited physical activity, limited opportunities for physical activity, and a very high level of obesity.
  • The city has an uninsured rate of 17%, which is more than 2% higher than the national average.

The report is very complementary of the Mayor’s “One Mobile” initiative and the Three Mile Creek park development.

Unfortunately, the community piece that was cited as most important in transforming our community was “Live Better Mobile.” From the press conference in 2012:

A “Live Better Mobile” program was unveiled today during a news conference. It’s aimed at creating public awareness focusing on three efforts – achieve healthy weights, prevent teen pregnancy, and quit tobacco.

The focus for the 37 community partners participating in the program is on prevention, nutrition and exercise.

“If we’re going to have a significant impact on health and well-being of our citizens, it’s going to take a community effort,” Dr. Bert Eichold of the Mobile County Health Department, said.

The group’s website is now dead. Their FaceBook page hasn’t been updated in a year.

So, Mobile, RWJF and the country are watching us. For the next five years they will be following the health of Mobilians. Are we up to the scrutiny? From the comments:

Talk from the fat cats is cheap. Want to encourage people in Mobile to Exercise? Give them a place to get out and exercise. Spend $70,000 on a weekly Ciclovia event. Pave that Rails-2-Trails from Prichard to Citronelle. Spend a money to construct Exercise Trails instead of spending money constructing Airbus Roads which don’t even have bicycle lanes.

 I just hope someone is in charge…

 

 

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Resident: This is an 85 year old woman who presented in sepsis from a multilobar pneumonia. Her temperature was 103.2 and she had a blood pressure of 100/60. Her chest x-ray showed pneumonia. Two hours after the antibiotics, she is up and around and wants to go home.

Me: Wow

Resident: I know, based on the CURB-65 criteria her predicted mortality is about 50%

I give away a lot of advice, that people may or may not want.  People come to me not for information regarding their disease but for a cure. They want to feel better. This is in part an residual of the miracles of the antibiotic age that I was a part of this weekend. Pneumonia, the “old man’s friend” is now, if treated efficiently and effectively, almost always curable as attested to by my patient form this weekend. The proliferation of “urgent care”s and “immediate care”s is partly because people want to feel better immediately (it isn’t Dr. Perkins I need, it is a prescription and a steroid shot) and partly they don’t want to miss a pneumonia and die (it isn’t pneumonia, is it?).

The antibiotic model is that it works great for pneumonia in old people in part because the outcome is so dramatic. The older person is still old but the pneumonia is now gone. It is a lousy model for chronic illness. Take insulin for 4 days for your diabetes and you still have to take it the 5th day. And the 365th day for that matter. Unlike the pneumonia, which if untreated will kill you quickly, the high blood sugar of diabetes rarely kills. It is the aftereffects, the sequelae, of diabetes that kills with heart disease, stroke, infection, and blindness.

The New York Times covered a science story regarding the differences in premature mortality between the rich and the poor (found here). In it they point out that the differences can be explained by smoking (the poor are much more likely to smoke, now) and prescription narcotic abuse (just because it came with a prescription doesn’t mean it is safe). The third contributor is obesity. The rich are less likely to be obese than the poor, but not that much less (31% vs 37%), so why is obesity more of a problem for them? The investigators didn’t know why, exactly.

We had another patient this weekend who was admitted for her diabetes that explains why obesity isn’t so bad for the poor but the sequelae of obesity is. Her diabetes is well controlled when she has her insulin. Her job provides her insurance. Unfortunately her job doesn’t pay enough to cover the copay for the insulin, her grocery bill, and her housing expenses. So often, she has to make a choice between food and insulin, especially if her job doesn’t give her enough hours. So it isn’t the obesity per se. It really isn’t the diabetes, per se. It is the need to choose between a warm place to stay, food for her family, or her insulin that forces her to neglect herself. The sequelae of being poor in America.

 

 

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